The Actions Of Lenie In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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Killing a friend may not always be wrong. But in the novella, “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck, two friends are traveling around California during the Great Depression looking for farm work. Although it is never mentioned, Lennie -the larger and stronger of the two- has a noticeable mental handicap, which affects him deeply later on in the book. George’s actions toward Lennie in the end of the book are justified because, first George was saving Lennie from the brutality of the mob, also he was ending the mental and physical abuse from the people around Lennie, as well as George’s own frustration and mental fatigue over taking care of Lennie. When George murdered Lennie, he did it peacefully, because he knew the angry mob would not have been so merciful. “‘I thought you was mad at me, George’, ‘No’ said George ‘No, I ain’t mad. I never been mad, an’ I ain’t mad now’” (Steinbeck, 106). This quote is from seconds before George pulls the trigger and it shows that he was reassuring Lennie that he wasn’t mad at him and that he should relax. George was setting a peaceful scene for him to die remembering, instead of the immediate stress and pain that was inevitably waiting for him if the mob got to him first. That’s why, no matter how sad and depressing they may appear, George’s actions toward Lennie in the end of the book are justified. Mostly everyone that reads this story has mixed feelings about the end, but what George does to Lennie is justified and a “help” for him, in

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