The Development of the Character of Othello as Shown by his Use of Language and Imagery in William Shakespeare's Play

2263 WordsJun 19, 201810 Pages
The Development of the Character of Othello as Shown by his Use of Language and Imagery in William Shakespeare's Play During the course of the play Othello's character goes through a series of changes, but ends up almost the same as when the play started, calm and in control. This change in Othello's character is like a rollercoaster; he starts off calm, collected and in control, and then quickly progresses to losing control and allowing jealousy to take him over. However at the end of the play, when Othello is justifying his killing of Desdemona, he is back to the calm collected General that he was at the beginning of the play. The setting that had been chosen by Shakespeare has features that are…show more content…
Othello's story-telling abilities are shown, when he is asked to tell the senators how he 'won' Desdemona, "…and with a greedy ear devour up my discourse," and further in the speech, "…and bade me, if I had a friend that loved her, I should teach him how to tell my story, and that would woo her." She fell in love with his ability to speak well and the life he led, and he fell in love with her response to his stories. In Act Two, Scene Three, we know that Othello's control is going to be undermined, but his control as he speaks does not start to change until he warns them that, "passion…assays to lead the way…" which subliminally prepares you for what is going to happen later in the play, when passion is allowed to take over this calm, controlled person. In this speech you are shown that he can get angry but he does not lose control of the quality of his speech. The conversation between Othello and Desdemona in Act Three, Scene Three is quite different to previous conversations between them.
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