The Early American Republic And The Constitution Of Our Multi Faceted Government

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, the Early American Republic faced numerous hardships from the beginning. More specifically, the framework, transitioning from the Articles of Confederation to the Constitution of our multi-faceted government deemed itself controversial. In order for one to determine if the transition from the Articles of Confederation to the Constitution was a major roadblock for American politics, we must analyze both standpoints of the argument. The two major views on this divide were the Federalists and Anti- Federalists. Federalists, predominantly landowners and industry workers, enjoyed the control by a strong, central government. On the contrary, Anti- Federalists, predominantly backcountry farmers and debtors, were already on the verge of tyranny…show more content…
Gordon Wood proclaims in Document 1, that the Articles of Confederation are too weak of a structure to handle a growing nation of this extent. Starting by listing numerous problems with, “The Congress could not tax and pay its bills. It could not feed, clothe, or supply the army. It could not levy tariffs to regulate trade or to retaliate against the mercantilist European empires.” Wood says the inability to tax, maintain an army, or have tariffs leaves the United States without money, unable to operate. In Document 2, John Jay explicitly identifies as a Federalist when he states the benefits of being under the Constitution. “If they see that our national government is efficient and well administered, our trade prudently regulated, our militia properly organized and disciplined, our resources and finances discreetly managed, our credit re-established, our people free, contented, and united, they will be much more disposed to cultivate our friendship than provoke our resentment.” Jay is saying that with a proper militia, organized government and treasury, and regained trust through our citizens and credit, we are more likely to flourish rather than struggle, as we can befriend other nations easier. While the United States gained the reputability it desired, it took numerous compromises both internally and externally.

Anti-Federalists, were predominantly in the lower echelon of society, fought for soverignty
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