The Effect Of Wankel Engines And Four Stroke Engines

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Have you ever wondered how engines work? That is exactly what this paper is about, engines. I will explain how Wankel engines, Diesel engines, turbojet engines, Gnome rotary engines, two stroke engines, and four stroke engines work. I will also explain their histories. Some times when you look at an engine it looks like a mess and you wonder how it could make anything move. The two stroke engine was very popular in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Two stroke engines were used in cars, tractors, and ships. One reason for their popularity was their simple design. The two stroke engine has a lower cost to rebuild and maintain than most other engines, which is why the two stroke engine was very popular. The reason why most two stroke…show more content…
While this is happening a crankcase compression is happening beneath the piston. The two stroke engine fires on every circle of the piston. Because of this they are more powerful than the four stroke engine of equivalent size. Two stroke engines also have lighter and simpler construction. These two reasons are, why they are used in motorcycles chain saws, line trimmers and outboard motors. Sadly two stroke engines cause a lot of pollution because some of exhaust gasses are expelled from the exhaust part of the cycle. The four stroke engines are used in lawn mowers, garden tractors, tillers, and washers. There is more than one type of four stroke engines. They are the horizontal-camshaft, side valve engine and the vertical-camshaft, side valve engine. Both of these types use four cycles four cycles in one full cycle. four stroke engine The four stroke engine is the now the most popular engine for cars. The first thing that happens is that the intake piston moves down drawing in a fresh charge fuel and air mixture into the cylinder. As the piston rises the intake valve is forced shut by increased cylinder pressure. As the piston rises, the intake valve is forced shut by the increased cylinder pressure. Flywheel momentum drives the piston upward, compressing the fuel and air mixture. At the top of the compression stroke, the spark plug fires, igniting the compressed fuel. As the fuel burns it expands driving the piston down. When the piston reaches the

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