The Eolian Harp Was A Unique Poem

1435 WordsFeb 7, 20176 Pages
The Eolian Harp was a unique poem, because it was a conversation poem between Coleridge and his wife Sarah. To start off Coleridge wrote this poem in hopes to convey his love and appreciation towards his wife and towards his second love which was neither. To do so in a non-love poem type of way he talked about three different topics throughout the whole poem. One of these topics was the concept of sin and forgiveness. Sin and Forgiveness were a key component to show Sarah how much he truly did love her. Why? Well the poem talked about how Sarah seems to be this great gift which Coleridge received from God, due to him accepting his sinful ways and god granting him this forgiveness and gave him a new start and new love (which was Sarah). “A…show more content…
With these three topics Coleridge supported his theme of love for nature and his wife. Within the poem Coleridge helps guide the reader through his train of thoughts on how he is expressing his feelings towards his wife and nature. Having used alliteration, we can feel what the poet is feeling, how he expresses how his wife shines bright and has a nice scent is made easy to us as a reader because of these alliterations. The following way that Samuel Coleridge could convey this theme of love without actually making it a love poem was by using different types of imagery. Imageries are very helpful when it comes to expressions, by putting down on paper what he saw his wife and nature be like, how they smelled, how they tasted and how they even felt is by far one of the best ways to help convey his theme. First let’s focus on how Coleridge “Saw” both nature and his wife through this visual imagery. “With white-flower’d Jasmin, and the broad-leave’d myrtle/ Meet emblems they of innocence and love!” (4-5) He saw both nature and his wife as these pure things that brought love and hope to his life. Another visual imagery that he used was that both his wife and nature brought this brightness to his life, like in “Bubbles that glitter as they rise and break.” (56). The next piece of imagery that helps the reader see this theme of love would be the auditory imagery,
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