The Expretation Of The Storm In Robert Frost's The Storm

799 Words4 Pages
Robert Frost's poem Bereft shows the potential of a big and devastating storm which accurately describes the situation King Lear is experiencing in Act 2 Scene 4 of the play. As the accuracy of King Lear’s personality is described, it can be seen that King Lear could be considered the speaker of the poem and that reveals his true feelings and emotions after his crisis with his daughters. King Lear’s personality and situation are first described when the first two lines of the starts with a question asking, “Where had I heard this wind before change like this to a deeper roar?” (Frost 1-2). Although this question shows the arising of a storm, it’s deeper meaning shows King Lear’s realization of his loneliness. King Lear has been listening…show more content…
As King Lear is receiving warnings of his doom, the end to the poem portrays the idea of his loneliness when Robert Frost describes a mental storm and the idea of loneliness and regret by using imagery of “frosty shore” in line 5, “somber clouds” in line 7, and “sinister in the tone” in line 11. This imagery additionally shows that King Lear can be considered the speaker in the poem and that without his daughters to support him and give him praises as their father, he is alone through both the physical storm and mental storm of regret. With this, the poem mentions another concept of King Lear’s downfall of power with Frost statement of: “Summer was past and the day was past” (Frost 6). Summer and day symbolize the idea of strength and prosperity while winter and night show death and sorrow. Although King Lear did have power and strength during the days he was king and had land, now summer and day are gone and his reign is over. Due to this, King Lear fall from power and his title of king as well as the way he is viewed changes from respect to disrespect. As this perception continues, King Lear is alone without his daughters thus causing him to express hatred, rejection, anger, and the need for love. King Lear’s expression of his situation directly parallels the words that the narrator describes at the end of Robert Frost’s poem which states that “Word I was in my life, alone, word I had no one left but God”

    More about The Expretation Of The Storm In Robert Frost's The Storm

      Get Access