The Importance Of Religion In Native American Literature

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The Sioux Native Americans have a profound respect for their faith and hold true to their beliefs shown by the sacredness of the Great Mystery’s creations such as nature shown in Standing Bear’s “Nature” as well as Zitkala-Ša’s American Indian Stories, Legends, and Other Writings. Differing from the Native Americans, the European settlers show a variation of different levels of reverence for Christianity and it’s beliefs. The European’s demonstrate a lack of respect for Native American religion shown by the tactical attempts to convert Native American culture to converge with their belief system and practices. However, Native Americans show a lack of respect for Christianity and its beliefs within Mary Rowlandson’s experience as a captive. She uses the Bible to pull her through heart-wrenching and painful experiences from being shot to loosing her daughter against the wishes of her master and mistress. Although the experiences within Native American literature display the importance of religion and devotion to the Native American beliefs and ceremonies, it also shows the presence and effect of religion among the European settlers both respectable and corrupt. Through early American texts such as Standing Bear’s “Nature” and Zitkala-Ša’s American Indian Stories, Legends, and Other Writings, The Native American tribe of Western Sioux Indians display a profound respect for the Great Mystery, the creator of the world and Mother Nature. The Western Sioux tribe had a deep
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