The Legalization Of Assisted Suicide

1280 Words Nov 10th, 2015 6 Pages
“And then as her voice slowed with the medication, she said, ‘I 'm sad to be going. But even with this early death, I wouldn 't want to change my life for any other life in the world.”’ (Solomon) The war between life and death will never cease to exist. The reality is that no one can stop this never-ending cycle, many terminally ill patients know this all too well. As time goes on, technology expands, so does the understanding of death itself. For over a decade, there have been several articles produced that focus on the ethical and legal issues that arise with this specific topic. In 1997, the Supreme Court ruled that there is neither a constitutional right nor a constitutional prohibition of assisted suicide. This ruling allowed for Oregon state to begin to “experimenting” with the legalization. Though, the majority of states continue to stand firmly behind their decision on the legalization of assisted suicide. On one hand, people find this issue to be unethical, that assisted suicide only exterminates the possibility of recovery. On the other hand, people believe that patients who have fought long and hard for survival should be able to decide whether or not they wish to continue their life. So the question stands; Should patients be given the option to end their own life with a physician 's assistance, or should it be deemed illegal in all states?
First, as this issue continues to raise heads, many claim that the decision should be left solely up to the person who is…
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