Essay on The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson

1173 Words5 Pages
In today’s society we perceive the lottery as being a great fortune brought down upon you by Lady Luck. It is a serendipitous event, even if the person has done nothing to earn it. One would never see the lottery as an unfortunate occasion that occurred in your life because it is supposed to bring prosperity into your life. Also, one would not dare to think that winning the lottery would bring such repercussions as injury or death. In the short story “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the author could have used Mrs. Tessie Hutchinson as the town’s scapegoat due to their reluctance to change traditions, her horrible work ethic, and minority status as a woman. In every village it is always difficult to try and change they ways of the…show more content…
Old Man Warner is a man who has lived through more than seventy lottery drawings, and has the traditions of the village deep within his roots. Old Man Warner gets word that in a northern village they are considering to stop the lottery tradition, and he just says that they are crazy (Jackson ). From his reaction to the statement made by Mr. Adams, we can tell that he does not want there to be change because the tradition is imbedded in his system. What others may see as brutal or heinous, he sees as mandatory and obligatory. The men in the village have the ultimate say in what goes on, and when changes need to be made. As men dictate what is to occur in society, more and more women want to have respect to have their voices heard, as well. The children run around and do as they wish without regarding their mother’s commands. They only listen to the father’s, and what they say. As Jackson said “His father spoke up sharply, and Bobby came quickly and took his place between his father and his oldest brother” (Jackson ). Before Bobby Martin’s father had called out to him, his mother had to repeatedly call out his name in order for him to come. Bobby eventually went to his mother, but she was next to his father when he did so. We also get a sense of minority on behalf of the women, because they are seen as less, even by their children. When the roll call is occurring they notice that Mr. Clyde Dunbar is not attending because he has recently broken

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