The M �� Ori Culture

2199 WordsMar 13, 20159 Pages
Most well known civilizations are fairly young in their life spans. The United Kingdom, France, Italy; all these cultures as they are known today have only existed for approximately 400 years. The Māori, an indigenous culture of New Zealand, have existed for a millennia. Specialized in nautical exploits, the Māori thrived off of the island 's bountiful seas and developed a unique, rich identity as a people. Yet rather than being regarded as a national treasure, most of New Zealand 's citizens and the rest of the world treat the aboriginal population as a novelty. Most top search results for “Māori Culture” are for attractions, guided tours, and similar spectacles. This culture, which has persisted for nearly a thousand years, is gradually withering into little more than a side show attraction. Rather than scholarly journals, articles, and history text, is instead an encroaching investment of the Māori as capital, and how businesses may benefit from them (Rigby, Mueller, & Baker, 2011, 121). This plight of exoticism is not exclusive to the Maori; aboriginal and indigenous societies all over the world are forced into a unique cultural adaption in order to survive in Western capitalist climates. Companies assume a guise of social interest, but “there is one and only one social responsibility of business - to use its resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game” (Rigby, Mueller, & Baker, 2011, 118).
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