The Narrator Character Analysis

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The Narrator is the round, dynamic protagonist who goes through a series of events over his life in the black college and in Harlem that influences his perception of himself. His character is revealed through the series of events little by little as he starts to change throughout his encounters. As mentioned, the specific details of the narrator is not mentioned, most noticeably his name, all throughout the novel. This creates two effects: to emphasize the narrator’s invisibility, and to effectively allow the audience to connect with the narrator as their own story. The minor characters revolve around the narrator as they help the narrator struggle to find his self-identity as a dynamic character. For example, Dr.Bledsoe is an important…show more content…
Although he was a man who seemed to be a good ‘Negro’ who was loyal to white Americans, on his death bed, he told his grandchildren not to be fooled, but rather be ashamed of themselves, which was a shock to his children and grandchildren. The grandfather’s words continue to haunt the narrator as he attends the black college and experiences segregation and difficulties as an African American in the North, despite the better racial environments. Therefore, the grandfather is an important figure who influences the initial acts of the narrator and allows him to look back to his memory with his grandfather to fully understand his identity.
Brother Jack: Brother Jack is a wealthy white man who recruited the narrator into joining the Brotherhood. As a white man with strong leadership skills, Brother Jack used deceptive language that made people almost mesmerized by his speech to get what he wanted. For example, when recruiting the narrator, Brother Jack asked him if he wanted to become the next Booker T. Washington. The way Brother Jack introduced the idea made the narrator fall for the job easily. Although he initially seems to be a supporter of the narrator by helping him to become an important individual in promoting racial equality while providing him money, we later find out that Brother Jack is merely exploiting the narrator’s skills in public speaking as an African American for his benefits. An extremely important physical appearance of Brother
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