The Pressures of Teenage Life

898 WordsJul 10, 20184 Pages
Teenagers constantly worry about their body image. Magazines, newspapers, and television don’t exactly help to boost their confidence. The portrayal of stick thin woman and body building men forces teens to believe they need to achieve that “perfect” body and look. The biggest issue of these images being broadcasted to teens is the effects that the images have on them. Teenagers who obsess over their body image can experience stress due to trying to impress others, develop an eating disorder, and neglect, and even jeopardize, important aspects of their lives when they focus too much on their body image. Stress is a big part of teenagers’ lives. From school to boyfriends to keeping up with the latest fashion trends, there is already…show more content…
The effects of eating disorders not only harm their health, but they also continues to hurt their self-esteem. Teens tend to hide the fact that they have an eating disorder as much as they can and that adds to their stress, and it eventually just makes matters even worse. Cindy Maynard, a health and medical writer and a registered dietitian, notes that eating disorders can also develop when a teen is pressured to look a certain way for a sport (277). Wrestlers are to be at a certain weight and can experience an eating disorder when trying to meet the requirements. Cutting weight in a short amount of time for a wrestling match takes a toll on their bodies, and the constant pressure to maintain that weight is overwhelming. Cheerleaders and dancers also experience the pressure of maintaining a certain body image. Although some coaches don’t come right out and say that it’s a requirement to be thin and fit to be a cheerleader or dancer, the expectation has already been set by the students in the school and even the media. Magazines and TV shows both show skinny dancers and cheerleaders, but the reality is that not everyone looks like that. The glorified “perfect” body becomes a lot less glamorous when you realize those people make up only a small fraction of our society. I was a cheerleader for three years. I cheered in junior high and my freshman and sophomore year of high
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