The Pros And Cons Of The Truman Doctrine

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Putting containment into practice, President Truman focused his efforts on stabilizing war-battered Asia and Europe. With epidemic malnutrition and tuberculosis tormenting both continents, communist parties threatening to rise to power in France and Italy, and Great Britain being unable to provide financial and economic anti-communist aid to Greece and Turkey any longer, the situation certainly appeared delicate and urgent. On March 12, 1947, Truman addressed Congress and unveiled the Truman Doctrine, which pledged American support to "free peoples” in their fight against totalitarian regimes, including $400 million to help Greece and Turkey (808). Congress approved his proposal and tried to facilitate America's self-appointed role as global policeman by passing the National Security Act of 1947, which united the U.S. armed forces under a single Department of Defense and created the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the National Security Council. The Marshall Plan, also signed off by Congress in 1947, channeled an additional $17 billion into European recovery (809). Following the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, the Soviets…show more content…
President Truman reacted and signed the Executive Order 9835 of 1947, establishing a Federal Employee Loyalty Program, which allowed the investigation of federal employees if "reasonable suspicion", which could be based on someone's criticism of American foreign policy and homosexuality, arose. Anyone suspected of having communist ties was immediately dismissed without any trial taking place (818). Simultaneously, the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), already established in 1938 to track down communist spies, began the investigation of communism in American everyday life and, in the process of doing so, thoroughly probed Hollywood sensitize the general public
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