The Relationship Between Politics And Hip Hop Music

1570 Words Nov 15th, 2016 7 Pages
Rap and Rebellion:
The Relationship Between Politics and Hip-Hop Music

The rap subculture is widely agreed to have been established in the Bronx, New York during the 1970’s. At a time when block parties became popular, especially among African-American youths, hip-hop music was a means of expressing opinions and values and as a new source of communication. At these gatherings, DJs would play percussive breaks from popular songs, often on two turntables to enable them to extend these breaks. This new culture defined itself by four key stylistic elements: MCing/rapping, scratching/DJing, graffiti writing and break dancing. As this style of music became more established, an evolution began, as sampling technology and drum machines became more affordable and widely available.
Although the origins of hip-hop music seem to begin in the USA, over a century before this West African musician told stories rhythmically, accompanied only by drums. Meanwhile in the Caribbean Islands, folk musicians were telling stories in rhyme – both were laying the foundations for modern day American rap music. The vocal style of rapping developed as people and artists at these block parties experimented with freestyle rhythmic speech over the top of percussive breaks, drawing inspiration from everyday topics and wider issues alike. The first notable rap artists included Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, DJ Kool Herc, Marley Marl and Doug E. Fresh, whilst ‘Rapper’s Delight’ by The Sugarhill…

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