The Significance of Shakespeare's Regards Toward His Mistress in "Sonnet 130"

918 WordsFeb 25, 20124 Pages
The Significance of Shakespeare's Regards toward his Mistress in "Sonnet 130" "Sonnet 130" compares William Shakespeare’s mistress to typical, natural beauty; each time drawing attention to his mistress’ obvious imperfections. He addresses her as if she cannot compare to the ideal appearances women are expected to look like in that of the natural world. The comparisons Shakespeare addresses highlight aspects of nature, such as snow (3)or coral (2) yet; each comparison proves to be unflatteringly about his mistress. However, in the final rhyming couplet, Shakespeare claims his love for his mistress by professing; that even though his mistresses has a great deal of flaws, he accepts them and loves her as much as any man could love a woman.…show more content…
The line, "And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare" is acting as the climax. One could argue that the climax is the most important element of a story because it is known as the most intense or exciting part . This line shows excitement because of the sudden change in Shakespeare's point of view. It acts as a decisive moment for Shakespeare in the eyes of the readers. This becomes intriguing to the readers because the poem quickly shifts to a love poem and emphasizes a way of love that all women wish a man could provide. This love is shown by Shakespeare through the way he states how a women needs not to be told unseemly lies to be loved like a women should be loved. Many would enjoy reading this sonnet because of Shakespeare's final declaration of love at the end of the poem. The line, "And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare" reveals a sincere depiction of his mistress by emphasizing unflattering aspects about her, which adds importance to his high regard and unconditional love for her. Yes, his mistress is not as beautiful as things found in nature, yet Shakespeare loves her nonetheless. In the closing couplet, he emphasizes the fact that she is as extraordinary as any other woman described with exaggerated or false comparisons. It is a blunt, but charming sincerity that make "Sonnet 130" a very memorable poem. Works Cited Shakespeare, William. "Sonnet 130." 1609.

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