The Struggles of the Worn Out Arthur Miller's "Death of A Salesman"

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From the time Arthur Miller began writing plays, till his recent death in 2005, he had never had such a well know play as Death of a Salesman. This play was first performed in the late 1940’s. It reveals the struggle of an old, worn out, salesman who is upset with the life that he has created. With the strain of his past mistakes lurking in the back of his mind, Willy cannot handle the stress and begins to have hallucinations of the past about the things he could have changed.
1.) Towards the end of Willy’s life he is beginning to realizing all the destruction not only of himself, but of his family, marriage, and job. Who is to blame for all this destruction? Society? His family? Or Willy himself? I believe the answer to that
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No one made that decision of cheating other than Willy; he can’t blame it on anyone but himself. Making that decision impacted Willy for the rest of his life. Every time he left he was so vulnerable for wrongful choices. Another big reason I believed that lead Willy to have destruction was that he relied too much on his children. He expected something more than they could give him. Both of his children knew they couldn’t give their dad what he wanted, which ruined their relationship.
2.) As the play ended the state of Willy and his mindset began to change. He started to relies the type of life he had lived and the type he wanted to live. Early in his life he imagined of becoming a successful business man. “Don’t say? Tell you a secret boy. Don’t breathe it to a soul. Someday I’ll have my own business and I’ll never have to leave home anymore” (23). One who would not have to travel, have his own office, and own a really nice suit. He foreseen all the connections he would have with others in the business world and how they would all remember him from the success he would have. But that idea was far from reality. No one remembered Willy in the business world he was just another travelling worker, no big shot, someone who was soon to retire. As Willy thought about this more all he could hope for was the success of the two good-looking boys he had raised, in hope that they would be the next big thing. But

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