The Teaching Styles of the Apology of Plato an the Gospel of Luke

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Socrates and Luke are both considered to be great educators. They have both influenced countless people with their teachings. However, comparing the two is slightly strange since Socrates is the subject of the story, which is told by Plato, and Luke is the teller of the story of Jesus. A comparison can be made between the two as Socrates is a great teacher while Plato is mostly silent and Luke, while not overly prevalent in the his story can be compared to other accounts of the story of Jesus among which his by far the most didactic. But when you are comparing the two you must keep in mind that you are in actuality comparing four and also that while the story teller is supposed to only be telling you what he saw, he is also telling his …show more content…
Apparently a friend of his went to the oracle at Delphi and asked if any man was wiser than Socrates to which the oracle replied that indeed, “no one was wiser.” (Plato 21a) Therefore Socrates reasons that he is on a mission from the god, as he calls it, to refute this claim. All the actions that he committed which were considered to be treasonous were therefore demanded by the god, and Socrates had no choice but to comply. This kind or reasoning cannot be argued with since it is backed by a god and consequently it is not. Meletus, Socrates’ accuser never says a word in rebuttal, or at least Plato never mentions it if he does. Meletus’ only role for the entirety of the apology is to briefly answer Socrates’ questions just in whatever way is most convenient for Socrates’ argument, thus reducing him to little more than a literary device.
     The teaching styles of Jesus and Socrates themselves as revealed by their appropriate biographers are themselves nearly identical. In chapter 17 of Luke Jesus teaches a lesson to the apostles saying,
Who among you would say to your slave, who has just come in from plowing or tending sheep in the field, ‘Come here at once and take your place at the table’? Would you not rather say to him, ‘Prepare supper for me, put on your apron and serve me while I eat and drink; later you may eat doing what was commanded? So you also, when you have done all that you were ordered to do, say, ‘We are worthless slaves; we

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