The Tragedy Of Hamlet By William Shakespeare

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“If you are sure you understand everything that is going on, you are hopelessly confused” (Walter F. Mondale, 42nd Vice-President of the United States). The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, written by William Shakespeare, is a classic piece of literature in which the characters’ actions alone contribute to one’s understanding of the entire story. One such character is known as the fair Ophelia, Hamlet’s lover. Ophelia is naive, malleable, and muddled. Throughout the play, Ophelia is seen as an oblivious maiden who is just another role in the story. However, as the play progresses, the audience begins to uncover more and more about who she really is, and her character begins to develop. Ophelia is easily tricked into doing her father’s…show more content…
Immediately after a traumatizing experience where Hamlet abuses Ophelia and declares that he never loved her, she cries, “That unmatched form and feature of blown youth blasted with ecstasy. Oh, woe is me, t ' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!” (3.1.133). Ophelia is so remarkably naive that she can not even begin to comprehend why Hamlet is so unbelievably hard to understand. She is distraught and lost in an endless whirl of tragedies and it is too much to handle. She is devastated at the thought of Hamlet not loving her. Perhaps she was just too ingenuous to envision the truth for herself. As time goes on, she grows more and more aware of everyone’s true intentions, maturing to a more independent and self-assured young woman. But when her father is killed abruptly, Ophelia snaps. She is driven to insanity that leads her to despair, jumping into a river thus, drowning herself. As Gertrude tries to explain to Laertes of his sister, Ophelia’s, death and she states, “There with fantastic garlands did she come of crowflowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples [...] down her weedy trophies and herself fell in the weeping brook” (4.7.235). Even just a few moments before she drowns she is collecting flowers just like an adolescent young woman. While at the beginning and end of the play Ophelia is seen as naive, in between she presents a different personality.
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