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The Use of Characterization and Symbolism in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby focuses on the corruption of the American dream during the 1920‘s. For the duration of this time period, the American dream was no longer about hard work and reaching a set goal, it had become materialistic and immoral. Many people that had honest and incorruptible dreams, such as Jay Gatsby, used corrupted pathways to realize their fantasy. People’s carelessness was shown through their actions and speech towards others. Fitzgerald uses characterization and symbolism from different characters and items to convey the corruption of the American dream. Fitzgerald expresses the corruption of the American dream through the use of characterization of different characters. Daisy is one of the few…show more content…
Moreover, Jordan, a well known golf champion, but was almost caught with an unethical play . “At her first big golf tournament there was a row that nearly reached the newspapers—a suggestion that she had moved her ball from a bad lie in the semi-final round. The thing approached the proportions of a scandal…” Ergo Jordan was a fraud, and tainted of one of the essential factors of the American dream, hard work. In addition to her unsportsmanlike behavior, Jordan’s dream to be the best at golf was being led by immoral actions. Her appalling deeds do not affect her in in any case. “The sustained good driver/bad driver metaphor, through which Fitzgerald hints at standards of morality and immorality, is evident at virtually every turn of the novel:…Jordan Baker (whose name combines two brands of automobile from the 1920's) wears her careless driving as a badge of honor;” (Mangum) Jordan Baker has pride in her immorality and is gratified by her dishonesty. Through the means of characterization, Fitzgerald expresses Tom Buchanan as another immoral character. Tom is portrayed as an egotistical, hypocrite who advocates white supremacy. His hypocrisy is shown when he speaks to Gatsby, he conduct himself as a “high” class citizen but dwells as a “low” class citizen. “I picked him for a bootlegger the first time I saw him, and I wasn’t far wrong.” “What about it?” said Gatsby politely. “I guess your friend Walter Chase
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