The Yugoslav Wars: The Greatest Conflicts Since World War II Essay

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Known as Europe’s deadliest conflict since World War II, the Yugoslav Wars (also known as the Wars of Yugoslav Succession, the Yugoslav Civil War, or the War in the Balkans) were a series of wars fought in the former Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. Though the entire conflict can be divided up into four distinct wars, they are related due to their common origin and the presence of the same ethnoreligious groups in the multiple wars. These wars have become notorious due to the atrocious war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by all sides.
To better understand the atrocities of these wars, one must have knowledge of the definitions of certain terms and war crimes. The ideas of “ethnic cleansing” and “genocide” are often thrown
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Known as Europe’s deadliest conflict since World War II, the Yugoslav Wars (also known as the Wars of Yugoslav Succession, the Yugoslav Civil War, or the War in the Balkans) were a series of wars fought in the former Yugoslavia in the early 1990s. Though the entire conflict can be divided up into four distinct wars, they are related due to their common origin and the presence of the same ethnoreligious groups in the multiple wars. These wars have become notorious due to the atrocious war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by all sides.
To better understand the atrocities of these wars, one must have knowledge of the definitions of certain terms and war crimes. The ideas of “ethnic cleansing” and “genocide” are often thrown around related to the Yugoslav Wars, as are the terms “war criminals” and “crimes against humanity”. Ethnic cleansing can be described as an “organized campaign to forcibly transfer a population out of an area”. It may be planned and/or ordered by a government for a variety of reasons, and consists of threats, individual killings, group violence, arrests, torture, rape, and arson; all leading to spontaneous evacuations, forced migration, or deportation of the target group. Genocide is typically considered to be the most severe stage of ethnic cleansing, with the key factor in establishing genocide being intent. The intended complete destruction of a group is necessary for an event to be considered genocide. The Rome Statute of the
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