There Was A Fear Among European Nations That The United

1693 WordsMar 1, 20177 Pages
There was a fear among European nations that the United States was getting too strong of an influence on the continent. As Trachtenberg explains, the United States was essential for Europe to rebuild itself and the NATO, serving as a mechanism to protect the continent, centered around the strong U.S. forces. But, there was a realization that Europe was right in between the conflict of the Cold War and that therefore U.S. influence should be balanced by another entity. This was, according to Trachtenberg, one of the initial moments that European nations started to think about the relevance of cooperating. Directed by Monnet’s writing, Schwabe supports Trachtenberg’s argument. Schwabe argues that Monnet saw it as an essential step in…show more content…
It was a first step towards an European Union. Not only Schuman was concerned with an integrating Europe, also Winston Churchill famously called for cooperation. Churchill said European cooperation would bring “nothing but good and hope in a richer, freer, more contented European communality.” Both Schuman and Churchill passionately talk about Europe not as a means to cooperate economically, but as a political entity that can ensure that a war such as the First and Second World War will never break out again. Besides creating a third block between the United States and the Soviet Union, European cooperation brought a possible solution to the German question. Central to European integration, according to the founding fathers, was creating a political identity over an economic one. But, it took until the 1970’s to establish a formal political forum that connected European nations together, almost twenty years after the creation of the ECSC. Monnet argues that efforts for political cooperation failed before the 1970’s, naming the European Defense Community (EDC) as an example. The EDC was a response to deal with the possible German rearmament in the
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