War from Myceneans to Rome Essay

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WAR FROM MYCENEANS TO ROME
The modern day soldier did not arrive at the current level of training methods overnight. Throughout history warfare techniques and strategies have evolved from the earliest primitive battles to the latest technologies. The only way to learn about war is to study the past engagements and lessons learned. There are nine principles of war as follows: Objective, Offensive, Mass, Economy of force, Maneuver, Unity of command, Security, Surprise, and Simplicity. These are the areas of study in order to gain a better understanding of what to do and what to avoid during any engagement. The battles from yesterday differ from those in recent years and today, because the more primitive cultures fought under their
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The Persian Imperial soldier used a different weapon, the bow, and preferred to engage the enemy from a distance. Although the average soldier also wielded a spear and a knife for close combat, the standard scheme was to launch a barrage of arrows from a safe distance from the Mycenean phalanx. A Persian foot soldier as well as a cavalry soldier usually wore little armor as opposed to the Mycenean infantry soldier. The Persians launched an offensive effort against Greece to stop the eventual takeover of their soil. The most noteworthy fact of the Persian Wars is that the Greek armies never launched an offensive attack on the Persians, but instead kept to defensive positions that protected them from wide open areas and the Persian assaults. The Persian Wars did expose a weakness; the Greek states were unprepared to cooperate together as a coalition against an outsider’s attack. The problem of the city-states not cooperating was resolved by forming a new alliance, the Delian League, which was converted into the Athenian Empire. At the heart of the union was a new form of tactic, a navy to control the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean Seas. With a navy to control the waters, the trade market grew and guaranteed the Athenian control of all commercial wealth. The Athenian control of the surrounding areas caused the remainder of the states in Greece to turn to Sparta. The Spartans were a…