What Were the African Reactions to Slave Trade?

1651 Words May 31st, 2007 7 Pages
What were the African reactions to slave trade? (The question requires for you to describe the reaction of Africans from the point of views of peoples, individuals and captives).

The Atlantic slave trade which was inevitably began by the Portuguese, but later in time taken over by the English, was the sale and exploitation of African slaves by Europeans that occurred in and throughout the Atlantic Ocean from the 15th century to the 19th century. Most slaves were transported from West Africa and Central Africa to the New World. Although slavery and slave trading already existed it became well known and practiced in all cultures. During this time while Europeans obtained most slaves through coastal trade with African states, some slaves
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The enslaved also became known as personal property to their masters and lost all their rightful customary rights being human beings. Portugal and Spain did end up dominating the slaver trade during the 16th century; as a result they shipped over two thousand Africans per year to the Americas. The trading that took place of import goods in exchange with the return of the exporting of Africans was a complete consequence of the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade. The profits from the slave trade were so great the Dutch, French and English become involved in 1550. With the development of tobacco as a cash crop in Virginia and Maryland during the 1620's and with the large expansion of sugar production the demand for African slaves grew. The end result and the direct consequence was that England and France compete with the Dutch to take over the Atlantic Slave trade. After a host of wars England then took over the Trans Atlantic Slave trade which overthrew the Dutch in 1764 and victories over France and Spain occurred in 1713. This allowed English traders the right to supply slaves to all of Spain's American colonies. The profits of the Atlantic Slave trade produced in the America's by slave labor were invested in England and consequently helped fund the industrial revolution during the 18th century. In return, Africa became a market for cheap English manufactured
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