Why Women Should Be Remembered For World War I

1384 WordsMar 4, 20156 Pages
‘Why should women of World War 1 be remembered?’ Good evening ladies and gentlemen, today I will be talking about why women should be remembered for their role in World War 1 and not just the troops who fought during the war. So why women should be remembered for World War 1? I believe women should be remembered for World War 1 because for women around 1917 were paid a really low wage of around 3-6 shillings a week for really long hours. The women took on the hard work that the men did before they went to war. Most women who did courageous things during the war to help the country are not remembered, so this shows that there is not enough recognition for the women during World War 1 and I believe that something should be…show more content…
The women during World War 1 braved the dangerous working conditions, conditions that they were not use to this is because most of the jobs they did before the war were nursing, domestic labour, teaching and easy farm work. But when the war began they took on the hard dangerous jobs that the men did like making the munitions in the factory and the explosives. Before the war Women did not have many jobs to do they mostly stayed at home and were housewives, they were not allowed to vote and were seen to be lesser value than men. The First World War opened up many opportunities to women around 1918 after the war ended such as 8.4 million women were allowed to vote, the eligibility of women act was gone and gave some women the chance to be elected as members of parliament. There have been some really courageous women who did their part to support the war even if it meant sacrificing their own lives for the troops and their country such as Edith Cavell. To me this shows reasons why the women in the war didn’t get enough recognition for their efforts and bravery. Mairi Chisholm and Elsie Knocker were two nurses who set up their own illegal dressing station. These two nurses did it because there was a lot of men/soldiers being lost to the war. They set up the
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