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William Shakespeare 's Most Beloved And Performed Works

Decent Essays
Hamlet, one of Shakespeare’s most beloved and performed works, is a tale containing and establishing many literary elements and themes still used in modern writing. One of the most prevalent themes throughout the work is deception. The method in which this trickery is applied so cleverly that it can even deceive the audiences to the playwright’s advantage. Deception is often used in modern text as a means to create suspense within the audience, as we are continuously clued into the information of one individual’s means to steer the other cast members in the wrong direction. This method is very explicitly demonstrated by several characters. Often the deception is open-face, not hidden from the audience’s view; this is plot based. When…show more content…
This incredibly dedicated disguise manages to fool the entirety of the court, as well as his own love. However, it may have worked well enough as to backfire slightly, to the point where certain events may have made this deceptive madness quite real. This is likely one of Shakespeare’s cautionary warnings against the prospects of deception, as it can turn on you in a stray moment. Polonius remains a prime example for this type of trickery, namely it’s repercussions. For all of his personal scheming and careful maneuvering, he still faced death from his deceptive ways. Nevertheless, almost all of the characters possess ulterior motives. The main antagonist, of course, should have the most demented means of accomplishing them. Claudius’s plan to replace his brother as king is going quite well initially, but he soon turns to steering others astray as the tables flip. When his mischief is challenged, he becomes quite vicious. This is a hallmark trait of villains across a wide array of literature, ancient and modern. Viciousness so abhorrent that it would drive him to order the death of his ‘son’:

KING CLAUDIUS
. . . By letters congruing to that effect, The present death of Hamlet. Do it, England; . . .

While it can be argued that Claudius was merely acting on his own safety, he was still the primary conniver from the
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