the bait

794 Words Apr 2nd, 2014 4 Pages
The Bait

Donne only uses four sentences for each little section of the poem, each of the little sections starts out talking about something different. For example the first little section talks about how the woman should live with him and be his love and what pleasure he will receive when he catches the woman. Donne illustrates that by using the metaphor that he is the fish and she is the bait he is trying to catch. The second section Donne says “warmed by thine eyes more than the sun” saying the beauty of the woman is that of the sun. The third section talks about “Channels” and that the men swim threw the channels and will take any path to win the
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Since Donne has no desire to love a woman and only wants sex with them, it is almost like Donne is putting those combinations together to state his point kind of like Chaucer did without anybody catching on to what he is doing. Another example of where he does the same thing is at the end of the seventh stanza where Donne has the two words “Deceit” and “Bait” saying that woman deceive men by their beauty, and Donne once again does it that way to try and hide what he thinks about women.

Digging deeper into the poem you see that Donne wants a woman just to have sex with which is called a “persuasion to love poem”. In the poem Donne also does not care if he does not get the exact bait (women) he is after because he lets us know that there are plenty more out at sea. The poem also has some metaphysical aspects to it in the since that it uses fish to represent men and the bait to represent women. The poem begins with painting a picture of “golden sands and crystal brooks” to the reader. An additional example of this is the words” silken lines and silver hooks. This gives the reader an ideal setting for lazy fishing by a river. Then the poet describes his lady as even more beautiful than the scenery, with such words as” when thou swim in that live bath, each fish will swim amorously to you. A shift in thought comes next, with the poet proceeding
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