Psychiatric Essay

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    Psychiatric Institutions

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    discussion topic about why “Psychiatric Institutions Are a Necessity,” In this article, professionals discuss why psychiatric institutions need to come back, and the reason is to keep mentally ill people out of prisons, get them the care they deserve and for them to have affordable housing once they leave the Institution. One of the biggest problems we are facing is not enough government funding for mental health services and affordable housing. I fully support for psychiatric institutions to come back

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    Psychiatric Prisons

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    Video Critique 4– The new asylums/Public Broadcasting Service This PBS special raises the question whether jails and prisons are turning into the new asylums for the inmates that are mentally ill. Psychiatric hospitals across America have closed and the burden has become on the police department to handle locking up the people that would normally do better in mental hospitals. After 1960 antipsycotic medications were developed and available for treatment and reduced the need for hospitals by

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    The issue that I choose to do my term paper on is, Children and Psychiatric drugs. It is shown, over the years, to be an increase in diagnosis of psychiatric issues in children causing medications to be prescribed. It is a concern if there are more children being misdiagnosed, underdiagnosed, or over-diagnosed. This concern comes from United States having a significant increase in children psychiatric diagnosis and there are some areas within the United States that have an even higher diagnosis

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    The Use of Psychiatric Drugs To Treat Children Statistics determine that seventeen million children in the world have been prescribed psychiatric medications for mental illnesses or disorders (“Facts and Statistics”). In a society where one in four people suffer from a mental illness, it’s disturbing to find that many of these people are children. Many of these children will never have the opportunity to live normally without being under the influence of a drug. After taking a position as a lead

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    American Psychiatric Hospitals are not Effectively Treating the Ill While the general public may view any psychiatric facility as being one to hold extremely dangerous mentally ill or the ultimate cure-all, treatment systems established for the mentally ill are far from perfect, namely inpatient programs. Within the past 50-60 years, rates of inpatient admission have increased, but length of inpatient stays has decreased, often resulting in readmissions for patients and higher rates of relapse.

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    “I no longer recommend psychiatric medications to anyone. I believe the science behind this is seriously flawed. It is based on false assumptions that lead to self-perpetuating mythology (and huge profits for drug companies).” (Smith). While it may sound appealing to simply take a pill for each of your problems, it has almost become common knowledge that medications which directly affect the brain, especially in the long term, can have many direct and indirect consequences. Nearly ¼ of all Americans

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    Introduction The assaultive behavior displayed by psychiatric individuals in patient care settings has become a serious healthcare concern. Current research shows that the most common adverse event among hospitalized psychiatric patients is physical assault or fighting. “Thousands of assaults occur in American hospitals each year, including psychiatric units and emergency rooms, resulting in the labeling of such workplaces by some as occupationally hazardous” (Rueve & Welton, 2008). This has led

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    their mental health so that they can live to their fullest potential. For example, mental health nurses work in a variety of settings, such as, psychiatric hospitals, substance abuse treatment programs, home healthcare services, community mental health agencies, and private practice. This paper will give a description of my clinical experience at a psychiatric hospital.

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    Riverview Psychiatric Center has lost its certification due to improper treatment of patients. The only definite way for them to regain their certification is to create a new facility for forensic patients. Riverview lost their certification because of wrongful use of stun guns, pepper spray, and handcuffs. They also made mistakes with giving medications, didn't take proper records and didn't report their patients progress. There are people that are afraid that if a new facility for just forensic

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    recent American history one could be civilly committed to a psychiatric placement without legal intervention. Prior to the 1970s persons with mental illness were often subject to gross negligence when they were committed to a psychiatric placement. Furthermore, individuals who were committed to these institutions lost their civil rights. Before the 1950s persons in the United States of America could be held without legal jurisdiction in psychiatric asylums. The 1950s had some changes to these laws. However

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