Twelfth Night Feste Essay

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    Feste Twelfth Night

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    Essay 1 Feste is a typical Shakespearean fool in the Twelfth Night. Feste works for both Olivia and Duke Orisino. He is shown as witty person who entertains everyone with his jokes, dancing and singing. Fool’s character is very ironic to his name because he is the wisest person in the whole Illyria who outshines everyone with his humour and wit. In his presence the mood of the environment becomes lighter and everybody have a good time. He moves easily between upper-class

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    Twelfth Night Essay: Feste is No Fool

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    Feste is No Fool in Twelfth Night        In most Shakespearean romantic comedies, there is a character that plays the part of a truth-teller.  And in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night it is no different. Feste, a clown, through his mixed up words and songs enlightens the other characters whilst playing the role of the truth-teller.  Through aiding the Duke with his patience, helping Viola with her love problems, and having a major role in Malvolio's downfall, Feste holds one of the primary

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    Feste in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night In William Shakespeare's comedy Twelfth Night, it is ironic how many times the fool is said to be dishonest, when, in fact, his role proves entirely opposite. Though sometimes the characters do not realize his hidden messages, the reader can instantly comprehend Feste's figurative language, which is evident in every scene in which the fool appears. Whether he is singing to Orsino, arguing with Malvolio, or playing around with Viola, Feste always

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    Trevor Nunn’s (1996) adaptation of Twelfth Night illustrates the complexity of Feste’s character and how important he is to the overall play. Ben Kingsley, the actor, presents Feste as sympathetic and gentle choric figure. It is Feste who allows the audience to see the films respect for the original play, and the existing issues within it. This includes the defencelessness of women, and the attractive, but dangerous, qualities of altering one’s true sexual identity. Interestingly, unlike the original

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    Feste the (not so much of a) Fool Throughout William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, Feste exemplifies the role of a jester and fool, but thoroughly demonstrates to his audience that there is more to him than the other characters might see. Feste is often degraded by his fellow associates, and deemed inferior to others because they view him for his “lack of wits,” but very few of them realize that Feste is anything but a fool. Feste is Olivia's personal and professional fool, and is therefore given

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    The Fools in Twelfth Night Essay

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    The Fools of Twelfth Night         It is not unusual that the fool should be a prominent figure and make an important contribution in forming the confusion and the humor in an Elizabethan drama. In William Shakespeare's comedy, Twelfth Night, Feste the clown is not the only fool who is subject to foolery. He and many other characters combine their silly acts and wits to invade other characters that either escape reality or live a dream. In Twelfth Night, Feste, Maria and Sir Toby are the fools

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    Feste is presented as the fool or jester, hired by Olivia to entertain as an allowed fool. Feste can speak however he likes to anyone and everyone, including a well respected person such as Olivia. It seems that he almost reverses the roles. He talks down to people that have higher “ranks” than he. At one point, Feste says to Olivia “Do you not hear fellows? Take away the lady,” making everyone else seem as they are the fool. Feste is actually quite clever and witty, though it may not seem

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    Twelfth Night Criticism William Shakespeare and The Twelfth Night Known for his tragedies, comedies, sonnets and love stories, William Shakespeare is argued to be one of the best writers of his time. Throughout his plays, including The Twelfth Night, he uses disguise and deceit to fool the other characters to benefit another. Shakespeare was born in April of 1564 in the town Stratford-upon-Avon. Although the exact date of his birth is not known, historians traditionally celebrate it on the 23rd

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    scene 5 by Feste the fool of the play, Twelfth Night. In the Twelfth Night Shakespeare demonstrates several comedic elements in minor and major ways. Three of the major elements will be covered today. Clever word play, mistaken identities, and plot twists. In act 1 scene 5 Olivia and Feste demonstrate word play. “Take the fool away!” (Olivia) “Do you not hear, fellows? Take away the lady.” (Feste) This was one of my favorite ways demonstrated in this play. Olivia meant to take Feste away but

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    Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare First impressions of Twelfth Night can be deceiving as on a simplistic level it can be portrayed as a typical Shakespearean comedy. However, Twelfth Night is a mixture of both romantic comedy and tragedy. The romantic comedy elements can be found throughout the play as its structure is based on a typical Elizabethan style, it has escapism with magical settings and happy endings, as is 'Midsummer's Night Dream'. Also Twelfth night

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