Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton Essay

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton      I was once called the most dangerous woman in America because I dared to ask for the unthinkable- the right to vote. I challenged my culture's basic assumptions about men and women, and dedicated my life to the pursuit of equal rights for all women. My name is Elizabeth Cady Stanton.      I was born in Johnstown, New York, on the 12th of November, 1815. My father is the prominent attorney and judge Daniel Cady and my

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton Essay

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton Elizabeth Cady Stanton was known as the "Daughter of the Revolution," which dealt with women's suffrage (Ward 92). Stanton was born on November 12, 1815, to Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston. Daniel, her father, held the position of judge of Johnstown, New York. Unfortunately for Daniel, Margaret gave birth to only three sons, two whom died shortly after; one at birth and the other after graduating from Union College . Stanton engaged herself in Greek studies and

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    P.1 27 January 2015 Essay Contest: The Declaration of Sentiments In the Declaration of Sentiments, author Elizabeth Cady Stanton expresses her anger of the oppression experienced by women in the United States. After being rejected to attend the World’s Anti-Slavery convention in London, Stanton was frustrated because she was being rejected for being a woman. This motivated Stanton to share her own ideas on advocating women’s rights and changing the way women are treated in society because of

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    for women’s rights, and her name was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, grew up with the best education for women of her time, with a nice family. One day while she was at an Anti-slavery event, she met Lucretia Mott, the leading female abolition, who inspired her to start a study into women’s rights. In 1847 she moved to Seneca Falls, with her Husband and 4 kids. When she was in New York she organized a women’s rights conference. In 1851, Elizabeth met Susan B. Anthony at an anti-slavery

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    The early life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton starts with her being the fourth child of six children. Her mother was from a wealthy family and a big part of the political elite of New York. Stanton’s grandfather was an officer during the American Revolution under George Washington, and was a part of New York state legislature. Her father was a member of the New York state legislature, U.S. House of Representatives and after 1847 became a member of the Supreme Court of New York State. During the 1830’s

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    the The moment we begin to fear the opinions on others and hesitate to tell the truth that is in us, and from motives of policy or silent when we should speak, the divine floods of light and life no longer flow into our souls.”– Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born on November 12, 1850, in Johnstown, New York. She had 10 brothers and sisters, but most of them didn't survive till adulthood. She was the daughter of a lawyer who made it no secret of his preference for another son, so

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton is considered to be one of the key leaders of the women’s rights movement. Canton spent her entire life campaigning for women’s rights. She made a major impact on women in the 19th century, inspiring women around the country. The role she played paved the way for women suffrage in the 20th century. In the 19th century, women were denied economic and educational opportunities. They could not attend higher education and enter high-income professions. A majority of women were

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    There are many important documents in history that have influenced the lives of women today, but possibly none more important than the “Declaration of Sentiments” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The declaration was able to make an extremely strong and memorable impact, not only for the ideas presented in it, but also for its strong rhetoric and use of figurative language such as anaphora and syntax; also, notable is its imitation of the “Declaration of Independence”. Though written over one hundred years

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    Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown, NY and died October 26, 1902 at the age of 86 years old. She was the daughter of a successful lawyer; who preferred her brother over her. Although he favored his son, her father provided her with an informal legal education. In addition, she was educated at the Johnstown Academy and at Emma Willard’s Troy Female Seminary in New York. Cady married abolitionist lecturer Henry Stanton and had seven children. During their honeymoon trip

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    A 19th-century suffragist, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who was born on November 12, 1815, became involved in the abolitionist movements and many women’s rights movements. She helped organize the world’s first women’s rights convention in 1848 which is one of her major achievements. She also made the National Women’s Loyal League with Susan B. Anthony in 1863, and became Anthony’s close friend. They later established the National Woman Suffrage Association together. With her knowledge and determination

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