First Nations

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    First Nation Rights

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    First Nation rights were inherent rights, this meant that they were rights passed down through the generations and have been in practice way before interactions between Europeans and First Nations. The rights of First Nations were also collective rights, which came from the use and occupation of an area. As such, First Nation rights aren't from an outside source, the crown or the government, but are from First Nations own use of territories, social structures, and political and legal systems. Because

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    First Nations Beliefs

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    the First Nations were criticized and judged for moving to Canada and keeping their own cultural beliefs. The natives held onto their religion and culture because it was a part of them and their past and they also would not give it up willingly because they have been through too much to give up. “The federal government and most non-native Canadians believed that life for the First Nations people would be greatly improved if they gave up their culture and became part of mainstream, Christian Canadian”(Freeman-Shaw

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    book ‘First Nations of the Twenty First Century’, James Frideres raises the question “Why do the health concerns of First Nations differ from those of mainstream Canada?” I hope to show that the health and well-being challenges faced by First Nations people are different from those of mainstream Canadians primarily because of the history of colonization, Canadian government policies and social acceptance of those policies. In order to explore the state of the health and well-being of First Nations

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    in Indian reserve land (First Nation land) and the security that could add to such interests under the Indian Act. Developments have been discouraged by their inability to acquire sufficient security of tenure or security of assets on First Nation land. Furthermore, numerous First Nations have been discouraged by their inability to provide appropriate security of tenure to entities that are not First Nation whom seek to utilize or evolve First Nation land. The First Nations Management Act, enacted

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    First Nation Peoples within Canada have been facing many injustices in their homeland since the dawn of colonization. The most unraveling point to First Nation assimilation was the formation of the consequential Indian Act and residential schools resulting in a stir of adversity. As racist ideologies within Canada developed, upheaval against such treatment was undertaken as First Nation communities fought back against government land claims and eradication of treaty rights. In attempt to make amends

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    Ever since the British and French came to Canada, the first nations people have always seen themselves get the short end of the stick. Examples of this are: having their land taken away from them, receiving racial discrimination, being victim to Residential schools and being assigned a reservation to live on. For the last two centuries our Canadian government has been trying to make amends to these First Nations People. One of these amends to status indians are: No Taxes on any funds inside of a

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    The First Nations were nomadic hunter-gatherers who treated the land with respect, this was before the Europeans came and introduced them to new ways of life while slowly trying to rid them of their culture. The First Nations were welcoming and provided assistance to the Europeans. The two groups began to trade and enter into treaties with one another. The First Nations saw treaties differently than the Europeans. They believed that the treaties were a way of guaranteeing a future between the two

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    The First Nations peoples of Canada’s right to self-govern has been a widely debated and highly controversial topic since the British North America Act in 1867, when the Canadian government gained the authority to negotiate treaties with the First Nations and purchase their land. First Nations people believe that they have an inherent right to self-govern, as they were the sole inhibitors of Canada before the Europeans made contact in the 1500’s. Before colonization, the aboriginals had formed

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    In the first source, the narrator is sharing a message to the reader, of how he doesn't know what group he belongs to, because he is “hanging in the middle of two cultures”, as mentioned in the source. This supports marginalization, which is when you are pushed to the outskirts of society and you feel like an outsider. “Being put between two walls in a room and left hanging in the middle”. In this excerpt from the text, the narrator means the purpose of residential schools were to take First Nation

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    1. Discuss your understanding of historic and contemporary colonization, how it continues to affect First Nations, Metis, and or Inuit peoples today and how it may be reflected in your proposed specific area of social work practice. To begin with, colonization began when first contact was made between Indigenous peoples of Canada and Europeans. At first the settlers were humble to Indigenous peoples and learnt how to survive the diverse land of what is known as Canada. As settlers began getting

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