Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essay

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Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet In the romantic tragedy `Romeo and Juliet` William Shakespeare uses dramatic techniques and devices to convey emotional inclines and declines, emphasise breaks and linking tensions as well as to underline the outlying plot diversification. Preceding Act 3 Scene 1 we see Romeo fall madly in love with Juliet and marry her, both showing his instinctive nature, and setting the scene for this dramatic twists soon to follow. In this way Shakespeare creates a semantic field of happiness, which he shows by the use of "positive" phrases, which are colourful and effervescent. This causes the audience to feel an even greater shock at the sudden…show more content…
As well as serving to lay bare Romeo's confused perceptions of the ever-changing world around him, it demonstrates his dire wish to inform the world of his undying love for Juliet. The use of these contrasting styles of language expands the feeling of Romeo and Tybalt's overflowing emotional anonymity to one and other. In Romeo's words "Fire eyed fury be my conduct now!" we see a startling before unseen abruptness that in itself reflects upon the watching audience a great and electrifying change in the hero's attitude to Tybalt. He finds his doubts well founded, which could be shown by his yelling this, or whispering whilst crying. His anger is so articulated for the audience, telling them he could be about to do anything, an act of retribution and revenge upon Tybalt, or even upon his self. When Benvolio recounts the actions of the day he uses cold direct words ("…piercing steel deadly point to point...") it is completely antithetical to his previously non-violent idealistic out look ("…I pray thee good Mercutio…") which would have been subtle and serenely spoken. This illuminates the truth that it was an intense high-strung battle this forces a tensional incline¸ leaving the rapt audience wondering what will happen. This is evidence for his pro-governmental attitude of abhorrence for the anarchic brawls which are the progeny of the linking rivalry between the competing
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