Analysis Of Charlotte Ballet And Jean Pierre Bonnefoux

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On February 2, 2017, I was given the opportunity to view Innovative Works, performed by Charlotte Ballet, and created by Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, in the Patricia McBride and Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux Center for Dance. Charlotte Ballet has been around Charlotte, North Carolina for twenty-five years as a professional company. Bonnefoux created the performance to announce the passion and intensity of each movement the dancer’s performed along with assistance from Mark Diamond, Sasha Janes, Sarah Harkins, and David Ingram. Before viewing the performance, the Dance Department of Coker College was given a tour around the building. During the tour, information was provided about how long the company has existed, we were able to visit the costume design…show more content…
Soon after the secretary and husband had the affair, he received a call from his wife that startled the secretary into getting dressed and leaving the office. His wife, sitting in the lounge chair, was attending a session with a psychiatrist about her marriage. She began to take advantage of the stage space to scream and release her anger towards her husband, while performing movements from an allegro. In the moment of screaming, she moved her way into the scene of her husband and secretary as if she were there, which only made it worse as she rubbed her hand against his shirt. Following the counseling scene, the end of the piece arose with the same pas de deux phrase from the beginning, except in a different quality. The husband was being very abrupt with his movement, while he was trying to ignore his wife. Pretending that her marriage was not falling apart, his wife performed her movement in the same quality fro the beginning.
Furthermore, “Gemini”, the second piece from Innovative works, choreographed by Sarah Harkins and music by Frédéric Chopin, was a male duet based on improving and sharing weight. Within the duet, the two males initiated an interaction with the audience in another language saying, “Konnichiwa”, which automatically provides the idea of the company being diverse. However, during the interaction to keep the audience engaged, one of the dancer’s remained in the stage space.
Following “Gemini” was a piece known as “Ever After”. The

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