Analysis Of The Book ' The Van '

1378 WordsMar 3, 20176 Pages
The van drives me to the edge of town to a cabin. A gruff voice tells me not to move. Was this where they kept the prisoners? Is this how it ends for me? All I wanted to do was to be with Nick, have him hold me every night and actually feel love once again. Now here I am in an old abandoned shack. Paint peeling off the walls, no air conditioning, and no toilet. There was an outhouse, but the sign on the door says “Out of Order.” I am in hell. I try to distract myself from wondering what will come of me in the morning. The sound of the dripping water from the faucet keeps me up for a little while, but I eventually fall to sleep. Suddenly I am awoken by a loud banging on my door. This is it. My life is over. Opening the door, I see…show more content…
We drove right out of of Gilead and made our own little home in California. If only that was actually how it ended. I wish it was, what a great story to tell my daughter, right? The day after my daughter is born, I am gone, dead. The only reason they are keeping me alive is for my daughter. Serna Joy will get to keep her, and Nick will never know that she was actually his. I am not surprised; I did not obey the laws and now I will have to face the consequences. I hope the next Offred finds my note, “La rébellion est parmi vous. Allez le trouver.” Rebellion is among you. Go find it. In Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale language, love, and rebellion are three of the most important topics discussed. All three show up throughout the book within almost every single chapter. Language was hard to find. Love was basically unattainable. Rebellion was among the entire city of Gilead. In my creative piece, I expanded on language, love, and rebellion to show that Atwood was trying to tell us that all three are factors of our everyday lives that we all take for granted. Offred was lucky to have had the ability to read, write, and spell throughout the story. I had Offred write another note because within the story she found the note left by the last handmaid. It was only fitting for her to write one to the next girl. Also Offred was highly intelligent throughout the entire book and never lost her sense of faith, the word to which she
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