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Analysis Of Under The Persimmon Tree

Decent Essays
Italo Calvino, Italian journalist, once said, “a classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.” Books can help build a meaning for the reality around you. They construct a perspective within the world’s issues. The words in these books can strike a chord within people’s hearts, minds, and actions. Suzanne Fisher Staples, author of Under The Persimmon Tree, uses her words and her voice to describe the plight of civilization in Afghanistan and Pakistan–the mistreatment of women. The mistreatment of women has been going on for centuries, even during the time of Muhammad–a religious leader who was believed to be a messenger of God. According to an article called, “Muslim Women”, Muhammad “improved the status of…show more content…
People need to step up and be heroes to help these heroines. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4KEQxVvwPw I previously talked about the mistreatment of women but something that is also very important is how women feel about all of this. It is very easy to find out the issue at hand but in order to really understand, we need to dig deeper. In the book, one character who lives Peshawar, Pakistan reminisces of how “easily violence happens here, how quickly it passes, with everyone acting as if everything is normal soon afterward” (Staples 81). Peace is a desperate situation for Afghanistan and Pakistan because of the Taliban’s sharia. When the character says that violence is easily caused, it relates to current day as well and how the treatment of women and Taliban rule is continuous. According to an article named “FATA women and the question of Taliban sharia”, “The precedent of Taliban rule and their treatment of women are visible next door to us”. This scenario is present throughout Afghanistan and Pakistan which make me wonder how these countries can return to peace after a long period of time where nothing was right. One of the characters in the book describes the things the Taliban forbids such as “playing music” or “laughing out loud” (Staples 12). The same character states other rules of the Taliban sharia. Some of these include, “the Taliban whip women whose shoes
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