Analysis of Singer´s The Life You Can Save Essay

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In this paper I will begin by explaining Singer’s utilitarian argument in “The Life You Can Save” regarding the obligation of affluent nations to give in order to alleviate global poverty. Secondly, I will analyze one objection to Singer’s argument that opposes charity. Thirdly, after examining the objection to Singer’s argument, I will present Singer’s noteworthy reply. Finally, after offering both an objection to Singer’s argument, as well as Singer’s rebuttal, I will offer my own view on whether or not Singer’s refutation is convincing. In discussing Singer’s argument, it is important to explain his definition of global poverty. Singer clearly states that extreme poverty is “not only a condition of unsatisfied material needs” but also …show more content…
In this paper I will begin by explaining Singer’s utilitarian argument in “The Life You Can Save” regarding the obligation of affluent nations to give in order to alleviate global poverty. Secondly, I will analyze one objection to Singer’s argument that opposes charity. Thirdly, after examining the objection to Singer’s argument, I will present Singer’s noteworthy reply. Finally, after offering both an objection to Singer’s argument, as well as Singer’s rebuttal, I will offer my own view on whether or not Singer’s refutation is convincing. In discussing Singer’s argument, it is important to explain his definition of global poverty. Singer clearly states that extreme poverty is “not only a condition of unsatisfied material needs” but also a “degrading state of powerlessness” (6). Singer’s argument asserts that citizens of affluent nations are behaving erroneously because they fail to contribute to the end of poverty they know to exist in impoverished countries. He postulates that the common person has the ability to point fingers at others, while he or she nevertheless ought to do as much as they can. Singer's argument is a direct criticism of a capitalistic system where extreme wealth exists next to extreme poverty. For Singer, the ethical call to assist in eradicating poverty rests in a person’s ability to help another. In his full argument, Singer considers three premises. The first is common knowledge that suffering and death is inherently bad. Singer’s argument for the
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