Analysis of the TV Program Star Trek Essay

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America got its first look of a program that would later become legendary on September 8, 1966 at 8:30 PM on NBC. America was never the same after Star Trek made its debut that night. The series did not receive the recognition it deserved until it was canceled after only three years and later returning in syndication. However, Star Trek was never an ordinary science fiction program to begin with. Comparison to other programs in this genre is difficult because Star Trek is certainly not an unconventional science fiction program- it is a science fiction program that displays America during 1960's. In fact, Gene Roddenberry, the creator of Star Trek, during an interview said, "I have no belief that Star Trek depicts the actual future, it…show more content…
How can the human race ever hope to achieve friendship with alien races if it can't even make friends with itself?" The program had two regular characters that epitomized American minorities, who were quickly acquiring a position in American society, Lt. Sulu and Lt. Uhura. Lt. Sulu, played by George Takei, was the helmsman of the USS Enterprise. Having a Japanese-American appointed in an important rank was certainly a huge step forward. Despite the fact that antagonistic emotions regarding Japanese-Americans ascribed to World War II had lessened remarkably, some unease prevailed as to whether a Japanese-American character would cost the program Indonesian viewers. Gene Roddenberry never considered Lt. Sulu as a "token Asian", even when it appeared like everyone was opposed to him giving a major role to minority characters. Lt. Sulu consequently became an vital member of the Enterprise crew. Compared to Sulu, it is unfathomable to envision someone else that could step into this role and play him so well. Lt. Uhura, played by Nichelle Nichols, was a communications officer of the Enterprise. Uhura, whose name means "freedom" was a Black-African princess from East Africa who was fluent in Swahili, which added a particular appeal to her character. Both Nichols and Roddenberry made sure Lt. Uhura was deliberately written as a "token Black", unlike Lt. Sulu. Alas, coercion from network censors and writers
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