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Buffalo Bill Essay

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Buffalo Bill

William Frederick Cody, also known as Buffalo Bill, was born into an anti-slavery family. He had a rough childhood, but despite this hardship he grew up to be an adventurous wild west showman, and achieve many historical goals. On February 26, 1846, near the small town of LeClair, Iowa, William F.
Cody was born to Isacc and Marry Ann Cody. At the time William had two sisters,
Martha and Julia, and a brother, Samuel. But he ended up with three more sisters,
Eliza, Helen, and May, and another brother, Charlie. In the first eight years of his childhood, William grew up on a farm his father owned and worked. During this time, William had plenty of space on the Plains
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After this failed, Bill contracted with the Kansas Pacific Railroad, in
1867-1868, to furnish buffalo meat to the workers on the line. This earned him his nickname, Buffalo Bill.
In 1868-1872, Buffalo Bill served again as an army scout when he was elected to the Nebraska legislature. In 1872, after carrying dispatches through hostile Indian country for Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, he became chief of scouts for the 5th U.S. Cavalry for four years until 1876. During this eight year period, Buffalo Bill took place in sixteen Indian fights, including the defeat of the Cheyenne at Summit Springs, Colorado (1869), and at Hat Creek, Wyoming in
1876, he was famed for his "Killing of Yellow Hand". Also during this time, in
1869, Ned Buntline (E. Z. C. Judson) made Buffalo Bill the hero of a dime novel that was later dramatized, and in 1872 he persuaded Cody to appear on stage.
Cody broke with Buntline after a year, but remained an actor for eleven seasons.
Cody made his first and most authentic autobiography in 1879. He was also the author of dime novels, as well as the hero of some 1,700 of these publications, most of them written by Prentiss Ingraham.
In 1883, Buffalo Bill was so inspired by the success at a July 4th celebration at North Platte, Nebraska, that he organized Buffalo Bill's
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