Capitalism And Capitalist Culture In Nashville, Tennessee

1854 Words8 Pages
Capitalism and consumerist culture has unleashed an attack on local racially diverse communities and replaced them with whitewashed hipster trends that offer no benefit to the original inhabitants of the neighborhood whatsoever, while heightening the profits of white property owners. Have you ever walked along streets of an urban area like Nashville, Tennessee? Nashville, a city commonly known for being a big small town that promoted its intimacy with history and southern traditions, began to evolve when massive investments toward convention centers, stadiums, apartment buildings, and highways flooded in. Along with this now almost unrecognizable city came a new kind of people that were mainly comprised of upper class Caucasians. Essentially, with the new city, came an influx of economic benefit through a group of buyers taking part in a bizarre redevelopment or urban renewal who focused on building the city upwards and outwards while overly exaggerating what was thought to be traditionally authentic. A city that remained true to tradition and its’ southern soul grew a new kind of loyalty towards an unorthodox form of gentrification. A lifestyle that was unfair and rooted in error. Gentrifiers often go in search of something that fits the needs of what is desired, something authentic. Unfortunately, Nashville became a spot for these people to, in their words, improve the quality and authenticity of the city. However, this false sense of authenticity blindly drives

More about Capitalism And Capitalist Culture In Nashville, Tennessee

Get Access