Causes Of Alexander The Great

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The Empire of Alexander lived on past the death of its founder, but soon fragmented into numerous smaller kingdoms ruled by his generals. The Macedonian homeland came under the control of the line of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, a general and satrap under Alexander. The line of Antigonus would rule Macedon into the middle of the second century BC, when the kingdom was overcome by a myriad of problems, both internal and external. The reasons for the decline and eventual annexation of the Kingdom of Macedon include the weakening of the Macedonian army, the chaotic political order in Macedonia, and the rising might of Rome. The downfall of the Kingdom took nearly 40 years to achieve, and thus no single reason may be looked to as the cause of Macedon’s annihilation as an independent country. However, the combination, primarily, of those three things as they will each in turn be highlighted, brought about the undoing of homeland of history’s greatest general. In the annals of history, few leaders are as well remembered, as celebrated, as Alexander the Great. Indeed, his epithet suggests much both about him as a leader and about popular opinion of him. He among all other generals and kings in history forged a lasting reputation as the greatest of generals. He held together a veteran army, and huge empire through force of personality. The loyalty of his generals, the Diadochi, was his greatest strength as a general, and his greatest weakness as a king. When Alexander died suddenly at
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