Children and Morality during the Holocaust

1405 Words 6 Pages
During World War II and the Holocaust, morality collapsed. It was no longer easy to differentiate between what was good and what was evil. With a world filled with starvation, dehumanization, and dictatorship, Jewish children had a rough life. They were not free to run away and play; instead they were either in hiding or a camp. The three sources that will be analyzed in this essay demonstrate how the Jews and Gentiles risked their lives to help save innocent Jewish children.
One Jew who risked his life helping orphans was Yanush Korczak. Yanush Korczak was born on July 22, 1878 in Warsaw. Ever since he was young, he had a passion for helping the disadvantaged. In 1912, he created a Jewish orphanage called Dom Sierot. He also was
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In addition, they lived day by day not knowing what would happen the next day. Rachel also doesn’t know what will happen the next day because it is very unpredictable. She is comparing living in a ghetto to a horrible dream. Once, she leaves the ghetto or wakes up from the nightmare, she will live in freedom. In addition, Kruger sees dark shadow and is scared of them. Adults wouldn’t be afraid of dark shadow. Clearly, she was a scared child. Similar to the orphans, they are feeling the same way as Kruger. They also want to get out of the ghetto and be a normal child. In addition, they feel scared and sad.
Once Hitler and the Nazis took control of Poland, morality went down hill. Anti-semetism got worse; the Jews had to wear the yellow Star of David, although Yanush Korczak refused to wear it. Also, his radio program was cancelled due to complaints from anti-semitic people. Even with the bad times occurring, Korczak served as a parent figure for the orphans. He always told the children to be positive and not to give up hope. Because Korczak had many connections with higher people in society, he was offered refuge on the Aryan side of Warsaw. But, he refused the offer repeatedly. He had the chance to save himself, but he couldn’t abandon his children. In addition, he declined the invitation to be smuggled out of Poland. Korczak would do anything he could do to save the children and not leave them, even if it meant he was going to die with them. He tried
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