Essay Comparing the Gettysburg Address and Ginsberg's America

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Comparing the Gettysburg Address and Ginsberg's America

Many writers have considered the identity of America. Two remarkable writers of two different time periods have shouldered this. They created two important works. The first, Abraham Lincoln; a great leader in the midst of an incredible time of change and confusion, delivered the Gettysburg Address to an assembly that came to him saddened and horrified by the trials of war. These same people left, changed, that day from the cemetery. The other, Allen Ginsberg, wrote the poem "America" for a generation of people caught between World War II and the Cold War. The comparison between these two works is important for learning the identity of all Americans.

The histories
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After their convictions they were given the death sentence. Many throughout the world claimed that "the two men had been condemned because they were guilty only of being immigrants and outspoken anarchists" (Sacco-Vanzetti Case 1), because the judge and jury were accused of bias. The two were electrocuted on August 23, 1927. This shows an example of the bitter twist from The Gettysburg Address of those who "here gave their lives that the nation might live". America's unwillingness to tolerate anything seen as subversive gave way to the deaths of Sacco and Vanzetti.

The presence of each writer's reality have interesting parallels. These works developed similarly with the present time in which they created them. The state of prejudice and inequality in their times became a part of what they wrote. Their own personal obsessions had places in them, too.

Prejudice and inequality were problems in times of both Ginsberg and Lincoln. Lincoln even observed "`an increasing number of men who, for the sake of perpetuating slavery, are beginning to assail and to ridicule the white-man's charter of freedom - the declaration that all men are created free and equal'" (Neely 35). Lincoln spoke in his speech of the "new birth of freedom" that would solve this problem; but it would take loyalty to the cause on the part of all Americans.

Allen Ginsberg cited instances of prejudice that
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