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Dadaism Art

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What is Dadaism? Dadaism was a movement of (anti) art and literature, which ranged in a wide variety of art such as paintings, drawings, photographs, poetry, sculptures, collages, and theatre acts. Dadaism was a movement (or not meant to be it was an anti-movement to begin with) that began in the early twentieth century during the period of World War 1 in Zurich Europe. Dadaism was meant to provoke it’s viewers and it was a made up art with no rules accept to not follow basic and modern art “rules”. People created Dadaism to mock and make fun of cultural values, social, and political views. My favorite artist of this movement are Hannah Hoch, Max Emst, and Kurt Schwitters, i choose to do these three artists because their work really…show more content…
The time she went to that school she mostly studied glass design, unfortunately due to the First World War outbreak, the school closed in 1914, and Hoch went back to her home. When looking at Hannah Hoch’s art pieces and other works I thought they were all very unique and interesting. Her work just kind of draws you in and makes you think. When looking at them, I would first notice the different colors she would use and the eyes of her people in the collages, and when looking at her work you look at everything in that picture.

Max Ernst was another German artist who was both a painter and a sculpture in the 1900’s. “Max was a provocateur, a shocking and innovative artist who mined his unconscious for dreamlike imagery that mocked social conventions. A soldier in World War I, Ernst emerged deeply traumatized and highly critical of western culture” (The art story) Those gave him the inspiration for his artwork and he was also known to work humor into his pieces as well. Max mostly took part in the surrealist movement as well as the Dada. In Max’s work he was one of the first artists to use the “Sigmund Freud's” dream theory to inspire his creativity to make his art pieces. “Ernst was profoundly interested in the art of the mentally ill as a means to access primal emotion and unfettered creativity” (The Art
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