Demand of Fruits and Their Prices in India

3206 WordsAug 4, 201313 Pages
Demand of Fruits and their prices Aim and Objective of this study: As the Indian population is increasing, the demand for fresh fruits and vegetables is also increasing. Owing to the perishable nature and very short shelf life, these items require storage and transportation facilities in order to reach to the customer in fresh state. This requires a considerable amount of effort from the involved parties. The entire chain is fraught with issues like lack of transparency in pricing (at the farmers' end), dominance of traders, weak links in supply chain, etc. This leads to loss of revenue to the farmer and increased additional costs to the other supply chain partners, which ultimately enforces the final consumer to bear extra burden on his…show more content…
Production increased 54 percent, from 28.6 to 44 million metric tonnes between 1992 and 1999, according to the Ministry of Agriculture (National Horticulture Board) for India. Fruit tree production contributes 10 percent on average to the gross value of total agricultural output in India, and 13 percent of the export earnings attributable to major agricultural products. 3. The major tropical fruits grown in India include mango, banana, guava, pineapple, papaya and lychee, with lesser production of sapota, jackfruit, phalsa, annona and ber (Table 1). Tropical fruits account for nearly 70 percent of all fruit production in India2. The 3 major tropical fruits (mango, pineapple, papaya) accounted for 28 percent of total fruit production in 1999, while all other tropical fruit accounted for 7 percent. Production of major tropical fruits by region in 1998/99 is shown in Table 2 with harvested area, production and yield per hectare by fruit in Table 3. 4. Mango is by far the most significant tropical fruit produced in India, followed by guava. Mango output was 9.8 million tonnes in 1999, with guava at 1.8 million tonnes. Papaya and pineapple are also important in the sector, with production levels at almost 1.6 million tonnes and 1 million tonnes, respectively, in 1999. Papaya production increased 96 percent between 1992 and 1999, and pineapple production
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