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Design And Innovation : The Sphinx Of Taharqo

Decent Essays
DESIGN AND INNOVATION: THE SPHINX OF TAHARQO

INTRODUCTION:
Since its establishment, the British Museum has been an iconic symbol of human culture, art, and history. It was built around 263 years ago and has served as the storehouse for many iconic discoveries over the centuries (Caleca, 1979). With a collection of almost 8 million artifacts and historical objects, it 's hard to choose one. Each object has its own value in the museum and reflects the ancient times (Caleca, 1979). In this paper, we will be discussing the artifact called "The Sphinx of Tharaqo” that is preserved in the British Museum.
HISTORY OF THE OBJECT:
Sphinxes are generally considered as Egyptian icons. The most famous sphinx could be seen in Giza, Egypt. Actually,
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DISCOVERY & EXHIBITION OF THE SPHINX IN THE MUSEUM:
The sphinx is located in the eastern wing of the museum. This is a fairly small artifact comparing with the original sphinx located at Giza, Egypt. It is famous for its projection both Kushite and Egyptian elements. The lion shown in the body of the sphinx is done in typical Egyptian style like the grand sphinx itself, while the face of the artifact clearly Sudanese resemblance of Taharqo, the black king. There are hieroglyphics and symbols on the statue clarifies the fact that it is a real and legitimate portrait of the great King Taharqo. The statue is kept in the central of the room in a glass box (Caleca, 1979). The statue is only accessible for viewing. Visitors are not allowed to touch the box at any cost, but they are allowed to take pictures. Besides the box, there is black and white steel panel where description about the statue is written. It’s said there that, Taharqo was in fact, the fourth pharaoh to rule both the kingdoms of ancient Egypt and Kush together, during the Third Transitional Period of the middle age (Török, 2002). Also, there was a mention that, this statue was built around 680 B.C. The statue was first discovered by archaeologists at a demolished stone temple in Nubia (now known as Sudan), which is situated in the south-eastern part of the Amun Temple at Kawa (now Gematon). The excavations were conducted and monitored by the University of Oxford in 1930 (MacGregor, 2012). Experts believe
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