Dr. Skilling 's Case

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I think he is very smart as he said in the interview for matriculation at Harvard University, “I’m fucking smart,” but his intention and attitude was too much wicked towards people who he bankrupted as a leader of a company. The neuropsychologist Ian Robertson at Trinity College, Dublin (2012), used Jeff Skilling’s case when he demonstrated the critical sample of addiction to power on his book. Professor Robertson described that testosterone is strongly boosted up after many leaders have experience of victory and power. Some are apt to be addicted to power if they continue to experience it. This status quo is called a winner effect. Mr. Skilling had a reputation for being arrogant and laid off the bottom 10 percentages of executives and staff members whose business results he evaluated. Moreover, he had ever shown even his middle finger to workers who lined up in the parking lot because of him, passing by them. He had sold his shares of Enron three years before Enron filed for bankruptcy protection. How wicked he is. When the professor researched on Jeff Skilling with a question of what he was when he was young, he found out that ironically, Mr. Skilling’s friends at Harvard remembered him as being common and nice. Mr. Robertson described that power is a necessary evil for a leader, but Mr. Skilling spoiled himself with addiction of power. As a result, Mr. Skilling was one of the worst leaders. He was brilliant and charismatic but snobbish, self-righteous and immoral. His

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