Effectiveness of Body Image Portrayal in Different Advertisements

804 WordsFeb 2, 20183 Pages
What many women think when they see a Victoria’s Secret advertisement on TV is to put the chocolate down and hit the gym. Why is this? To be beautiful and fit is a prerequisite to becoming a model for their various lingerie campaigns. People all around the world tune in to watch the annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, and see their “Angels” strut down the walkway in lingerie. In today’s society, being thin is considered attractive and acceptable—what the ideal woman should look like. While no one wishes to think him or herself vain, most people are affected by what the media portrays as a standard for beauty. This does not simply affect adolescents, but older generations as well. A Harvard study showed that “up to two thirds of underweight 12-year-old girls considered themselves to be too fat” (Fox). The media portrays this standard of beauty as adequate and attainable. When one passes by the Victoria’s Secret store and glances at the massive posters of a beautiful model, he or she probably admires the perfection. But is it a fair representation of the average American woman? No. Advertisements such as Victoria’s Secret have been criticized for projecting an unrealistic image of what women should look like to females of all ages. Ads like Victoria’s Secret seem to target college age women. I will analyze two advertisements, Victoria’s Secret and Dove, aimed at different types of women and age groups, paying special attention to audience, purpose and context to support my
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