Family Structure And Children 's Educational Success

1280 Words6 Pages
Family Structure and Children’s Educational Success
Taylor Yonce
Sociology 2010-Section 012
Shannon McDonough
11/23/15

Introduction

Nontraditional family structures have become more common and accepted throughout today’s society than in the past. This shift in family structure could have great implications for children and their future success. I chose to research whether children raised in traditional families tend to achieve more academically than those raised in nontraditional families. Traditional families can have various meanings, even just within the American culture. It can be very complicated to distinguish which structures are best because there are so many, some of which are single
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This caused the children not to have as many opportunities as children in more financially stable households. The second reason was that there was often added stress on the children. Many times this was due to conflict between divorced parents. Because of this, children seemed unable to spend as much time and focus on academics. Since I observed this, I became interested to discover if this could also be observed in across American society as a whole.

Literature Review

According to (FamilyFacts.org, n.d.) the proportion of American children being raised in single-parent homes has nearly doubled over the past thirty five years, whereas the proportion of children being raised in two-parent homes has dropped about fifteen percent. (FamilyFacts.org, n.d.) states that family structure plays a significant role on an individual’s academic performance; from preschool readiness to college levels. This source discusses the major role that family structure plays on a student’s performance. It gives many effects throughout different stages of life including teen pregnancy, incarceration, and psychological issues. The article also states that if the U.S. family structure was as strong today as it was in 1970 531,000 fewer children each year would need psychotherapy and 453,000 fewer children would be involved in violence each year. (Teachman, 2008) also states that the family structure in which a child is raised
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