Freud 's Theory Of Repression

1558 WordsNov 22, 20157 Pages
Freud’s Repression Hypothesis Freud’s theory about repression is widely studied and discussed in the psychological studies. The repression is a normal way of life as every human receives numerous limitations by civil society. In book stated as, “The organic periodicity of the sexual process has persisted, it is true, but its effect on mental sexual excitation has been almost reversed. This change is connected primarily with the diminishing importance of the olfactory stimuli by means of which the menstrual process produced sexual excitement in the mind of the male. Their function was taken over by visual stimuli, which could operate permanently, instead of intermittently like the olfactory ones.” [Freud, 19]. It’s the unconscious mind that became the basis of Freud’s theory of repression, which Freud believed to be the cause of painfully holding back some emotions or desires by people who were too afraid to acknowledge them. Repression means to secretly lock away desires in your unconscious mind, which you are too afraid to even believe that you have them. Sexual repression can be defined as a state in which an individual is prohibited to express sexual desires. It is often linked to the feelings of shame, guilt or being connected with the sexual impulses. As if the writer said, “Psychologically it is fully justified in beginning by censuring any manifestations of the sexual life of children, for there would be no prospect of curbing the sexual desires of adults if the
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