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Government Causes And Consequences Of The Vietnam War

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There were many causes of the Vietnam War, like government components and consequences that caused the Cold War. The causes of the Vietnam War were surrounded by the simple ideas held by America that communism was threatening to cover all over south-east Asia.
Before World War Two, Vietnam had been part of the French Empire. Which was during the war, the country had been overpopulated by the Japanese race. When the Japanese retreated, the people of Vietnam took the opportunity to establish their own government controlled by Ho Chi Minh. The subsequent treaty signed in July 1954 at a Geneva conference split Vietnam along the latitude (17 degrees north latitude) with Ho in control in the North and Bao in the South. The treaty also called for
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Eisenhower had pledged his firm support to Diem and South Vietnam. With preparation and work from American military and the CIA, Diem's security forces tracked down on Viet Minh sympathizers in the south, whom he derisively called Vietnamese Communist, arresting some 100,000 people, many of whom were tortured and executed. By 1957, the Viet Cong and other opponents of Diem's repressive regime began fighting back with attacks on government officials and other targets, and by 1959 they had begun engaging the South Vietnamese army in firefights. In December 1960, Diem's many opponents within South Vietnam both communist and non-communist formed the National Liberation Front (NLF) to organize resistance. Though the NLF claimed to be autonomous and that most of its members were not communists, many in Washington assumed it was a puppet of Hanoi. A team sent by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 to report on conditions in South Vietnam advised a build-up of American military (economic and technical aid) in order to help Diem confront the Viet Cong threat. Working under the "domino theory," which held that if one Southeast Asian country fell to communism, many other countries would follow, Kennedy increased U.S. aid, though he stopped short of committing to a large-scale military intervention. By 1962, the U.S. military presence in South Vietnam had reached some 9,000 troops, compared to 800 during the 1950s. November 1963,
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