Grapes of Wrath - Chapter 25 Analysis

1469 Words Mar 26th, 2013 6 Pages
AP Language, Per. 5
12 January 2013
Grapes of Wrath Analysis
The cold, soaked earth, which was a source of life not too long ago, abducts a young child while the mother can only watch hopelessly as the husband shovels mounds of dirt. This event is not too different than most that citizens living during the Dust Bowl had to deal with. The self-destructive nature caused the American people to keep expanding and shaping the land as they saw fit. Because of this they overworked the land which, combined with drought, caused the Dust Bowl. The big corporations soon bought out most of the land in the Mid-West and many families were soon forced to make their living by other means. The shift of these families out west to a limited number of jobs
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Steinbeck finishes the section with another usage of asyndeton to describe all of the things that these men can do to "drive the earth to produce" or in modern terms: control the wealth of the country.
In (chapters 6-13), the landscape of California changes for the worst as Steinbeck tries to describe the damage that the men have inflicted on California. Steinbeck's diction with words such as "rot", "waste", and "decay" associate the former Edenic Califronia with a deathly image. This diction corresponds with the shift in imagery that shows "meat turning dark and crop shriveling on the ground" along with "black shreds(of cherries) hanging from them(the seeds)"; further depicting the change of landscape of California. Instead of "valleys in which fruit blossoms", the valley expels an "odor of sweet decay" showing the horrible state that California has turned in to under the guidance of the "understanding" men. Steinbeck also uses strong imagery to depict plentiful pears falling "heavily to the ground and splashing on the ground"; a symbol Steinbeck also changes the main theme of colors from the beautiful pink and green of the former California to a deathly black. Steinbeck also uses the vernacular of Californians to show the panic that the farmers feel by expressing such phrases as "We can't do it." and "We can't pay wages, no matter what wages." putting the reader in to the mind of the farmers to experience that panic and…